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  • In the words of Tone Loc... Let's do it : barking, planes... a few Howitzer rounds... Awesome 8-) oh yeah, peeling church bells, from Big Ben - nice.
  • In the words of Tone Loc... Let's do it : barking, planes... a few Howitzer rounds... Awesome 8-) oh yeah, peeling church bells, from Big Ben - nice.
  • "One moment, please." ought to suffice... you've got ME thinking about that skit, now!

  • Likewise on the flexibility. I was being humorous. :) the big gigs here are indeed done in soho studios thus far.
    ...but those planes are still unpredictable!
    So for discussion purposes on your video topic - what if you *are* having the skype session & a plane tears up the sky...what do you say??
    Actually I'm having a bit of a giggle to self...a spoof skit is crying to be made 8-)
  • Yes, Sini. It like an equipment malfunction when you have a client sitting there paying 200 dollars an hour just for the studio, nevermind talent fees. It happens to the best... but rarely.

    If you have an unpredictable problem with extraneous noise during the hours when you do most of your work, it certainly must be addressed. A client doesn't expect that a session with a professional voice talent working from a home studio is going to be interrupted by a barking dog.

    I should add that I am blessed with many clients who hire me to do what I do and leave me to do it. When working from my home studio I am able to schedule and work around noises if necessary so it is never an issue from the client perspective.
  • Keith, I think you are doing a great job of 'demystifying' the recording environment actually. I had put off even considering setting up a home studio for years because I had only ever recorded in booths in studios...with accompanying high-end kit and acoustics. And thanks to folks like you (and Dan Lenard) the reality is a lot easier to deal with. I also live in a quiet neighbourhood - surprisingish for central(ish) London. I can taze the schoolkids when they get out at half-3, but I can't control the Friday flight path! (I've given up - anyone within the vicinity would think a woman with terminal tourettes dwells there.)
    And it is that that hangs a query. It has never so far gotten in the way of a skype or phone meeting, but how to explain when that eventually occurs??
    Would not the client/director etc on the other end expect you to be recording from a water tight environment? Do u think they'd think badly of us...that we're practically recording from the middle of a field!?
  • Keith, I think you are doing a great job of 'demystifying' the recording environment actually. I had put off even considering setting up a home studio for years because I had only ever recorded in booths in studios...with accompanying high-end kit and acoustics. And thanks to folks like you (and Dan Lenard) the reality is a lot easier to deal with. I also live in a quiet neighbourhood - surprisingish for central(ish) London. I can taze the schoolkids when they get out at half-3, but I can't control the Friday flight path! (I've given up - anyone within the vicinity would think a woman with terminal tourettes dwells there.)
    And it is that that hangs a query. It has never so far gotten in the way of a skype or phone meeting, but how to explain when that eventually occurs??
    Would not the client/director etc on the other end expect you to be recording from a water tight environment? Do u think they'd think badly of us...that we're practically recording from the middle of a field!?
  •  

    Thanks for the comment, Jim and I am glad you brought up the acoustic issue. I needed a little prodding.

    Much has been said about acoustics and isolation booths for VO. I see a lot of effort and expense going into building voice over booths when in many cases it is overkill. Ever see the video of Joe Cip doing a VO in the back of his car in a parking lot? I've done the same and it can sound great.

    We are dealing with two things 1) the sound of the 'room' and 2) isolating yourself, or the mic, from extraneous 'outside noise'.

    In my video, I am sitting at a desk in front of a couple video monitors not in an iso booth.

    I am in a basement surrounded by earth and concrete. Half the battle is won. I am in a relatively quiet neighborhood, but I do have to stop on occasion because of a small aircraft overhead or if a fire truck pulls up next door. I know of many professional studios that have to do the same... but rarely.

    Equipment noise is the other issue. I have isolated the equipment instead of myself. I built a small ventilated, ‘acoustically treated’ (read: convoluted foam) booth for my computers (essentially a closet) and used extension cables for monitors and keyboards. Now I have access to everything I need including a stimulating environment. I spend a lot of time in this room.

    The sound of the room is the next issue. A sound proof anechoic chamber isn’t necessary.

    You don’t want a room that sounds like a public wash room unless you are doing spontaneous 4 part harmony with your friends and I don’t recommend a room that is so ‘tight’ that reverb needs to be added to your voice just to liven it up a bit.

    Instead of special ‘acoustic’ foam on all walls, I have a couple panels of ‘convoluted’ (mattress) foam in a few spots, some cork panels on the ceiling above my desk, a couple of place mats on my desk (for the same reason many professional recording studios will have a piece of carpet or cloth on the copy stand – so it doesn’t reflect your voice immediately back to the microphone), my grandmothers quilt draped over an interesting stick on one wall, a couple stacks of wooden shelves in the room, a 2x5 ft burlap covered cork bulletin board over my desk behind the monitors, vinyl Venetian blinds on the one small window in the room, pictures and lamps, a fully carpeted floor… just make sure there is nothing that is going to create a sympathetic vibration. For example, the springs on a microphone extension stand can sometimes be a problem.

    The picture I am painting here is one of a room that has no opposing flat surfaces that can reflect sound and a lot of stuff that either absorbs the sound or breaks it up so my voice doesn’t ping or bounce of the walls. I am not trying to achieve a totally dead sounding room, just one that isn’t too ‘live’ and has a nice natural intimate sound.

    The reason I wanted to talk about this is I thought there might be some reaction to the fact that I am not in a proper ‘voice booth’.

  • Hi Keith. I guess I'm a little late to comment, but what a great video! I appreciate the post. And I for one, AM interested in the acoustic treatment. The audio certainly sounds good and you've found something that works well for your room. I'm updating booth and would love to hear more details.
  • Thanks for the comment, Lowell. There was no decernable bleed from the client side. Skype was on a seperate computer with the speaker on a carpeted floor under my desk at a comfortable volume for monitoring comments. I was working the mic relatively close so it doesn't pick much 'room' at all. I believe I would have heard the client had they commented in the middle of take.
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